Survey: U.K. Workers Least Likely to Ask for Promotion

London — Oct. 25

U.K. employees are the least likely to ask for a job promotion or request help in finding a mentor, according to the 2012 HR Beat, an international survey of hiring managers and HR professionals.

The independent research, conducted by Dimensional Research and commissioned by SuccessFactors, questioned more than 1,500 HR leaders and hiring managers throughout the U.S., Australia, France, the Netherlands, Germany and the U.K. Among all the countries surveyed, hiring managers in the U.K. are also the least likely to use Facebook to communicate with employees or use social media to identify prospective job candidates.

Job hunters in the U.K. (89 percent) and employees in the U.K. (83 percent) are looking for non-financial benefits, beyond what they were initially offered, according to the survey.

When requesting additional benefits, job candidates in the U.K. asked for flexible work hours (59 percent) and higher pay (58 percent), while 45 percent of employees in the U.K. want flexible work hours. Employees in the U.K. also want time off work to volunteer (20 percent).

Millennials in the U.K. — those younger than 33 years old — want to be developed and nurtured in the workplace. Further, millennial job candidates are more likely to request training (47 percent) and mentors.

By contrast, Generation X employees — those 33-50 years old — in the U.K. are most likely to ask for a non-scheduled bonus (41 percent), and Generation X job hunters in the U.K. are most likely to ask for a jump in status with a higher job title (40 percent).

Baby boomers — those more than 50 years old — in the U.K. who are looking for jobs are most likely to ask for a hiring bonus (9 percent) or a flexible work location (8 percent).

Overall, female job candidates and female employees in the U.K. are more likely to ask for flexible work hours, flexible work locations and more holiday time than their male counterparts. Male job candidates and male employees in the U.K. are more likely to ask for a bonus, more pay or a better title.

Less than half (47 percent) of hiring managers in the U.K. use social media or CV sites to identify job candidates, such as LinkedIn (28 percent), Facebook (21 percent) or CV search sites (12 percent). Of all those surveyed, hiring managers in the U.K. are also the least likely to use Xing (2 percent) to identify job candidates.

Likewise, only 38 percent of hiring managers in the U.K. use social media or texting to communicate with job candidates. In fact, of all those surveyed the hiring managers in the U.K. are the least likely country to use Facebook to communicate with job candidates (11 percent).

Source: SuccessFactors