Survey: Retail Seasonal Hiring Trending Up

Chicago — Oct. 25

Retailers are stocking their stores with more than just merchandise going into the holiday season — they are also adding more seasonal help, according to a nationwide CareerBuilder survey.

Thirty-six percent of retailers plan to have extra hands on deck around the holidays, a healthy jump from 29 percent in 2011. The survey was conducted by Harris Interactive among more than 2,400 employers between Aug. 13 and Sept. 6.

While seasonal hiring is expected across the country, the five cities with the largest economies and plans to hire include:

• Los Angeles — 22 percent of employers plan to hire season help, with 40 percent planning to transition them to full-time positions.
• New York — 16 percent of employers plan to hire season help, with 35 percent planning to transition them to full-time positions.
• Atlanta — 15 percent of employers plan to hire season help, with 31 percent planning to transition them to full-time positions.
• Philadelphia — 14 percent of employers plan to hire season help, with 36 percent planning to transition them to full-time positions.
• Chicago — 13 percent of employers plan to hire season help, with 31 percent planning to transition them to full-time positions.

When looking at functional areas within an office or store, popular areas for recruitment this holiday season include, according to the survey:

• Customer service.
• Administrative/clerical support.
• Hospitality.
• Shipping/delivery.
• Accounting/finance.
• Inventory management.
• Technology.
• Sales (other than retail).

Moreover, more than 62 percent of employers plan to pay holiday staff $10 or more an hour in 2012, up from 53 percent last year. Twenty-two percent will pay $16 or more, up from 14 percent last year.

While holiday jobs fill up quickly, 36 percent of employers who are hiring seasonal staff reported they hire the most in October. Plans to hire in November (30 percent) remain strong; hiring tails off in December (11 percent).

Source: CareerBuilder