Using Noncash Rewards to Motivate, Retain and Engage Employees

 -  5/3/07

There is perhaps no subject debated more frequently by incentive program providers and their clients than the value of tangible, noncash incentives versus cash.

There is perhaps no subject debated more frequently by incentive program providers and their clients than the value of tangible, noncash incentives versus cash. Because companies routinely say people are their greatest asset, it’s imperative n today’s competitive market that they stand up to this mantra by rewarding their employees correctly. This should encourage higher performance and promote valued company behaviors.

Unfortunately, on average, fewer than 20 percent of organizations truly walk the talk. According to research from employee recognition company Michael C. Fina, the best-managed companies use noncash awards and incentives to keep employees engaged.

Why is it Critical to Effectively Reward Employees?

Employee recognition is a communication tool that allows companies to reinforce and reward behaviors that reflect of the organization’s core values and objectives. Recognition and retention programs also instill a climate of trust within the workforce.

Companies must remember the people they employ are the foundation for the way the organization grows and is perceived in the marketplace. Companies that prioritize employee recognition demonstrate their interest in fostering a positive, productive and innovative culture among their employees. Employees who feel appreciated are more positive about themselves and the contributions they make. Because companies must retain their employees to be successful, they need to have an effective recognition program. It’s critical for companies to choose the correct program.

Why Not Cash?

Companies continue to reward their employees with cash awards because of convenience. In addition, they perceive cash as the incentive of choice because of employee surveys. Many companies have surveyed their employees and have determined they want more cash. Companies might not be asking the question the right way, however.

In the 2004 University of Chicago study, “Right Answer, Wrong Questions,” researcher Scott Jeffrey, Ph.D., found, “What employees say they want and what they actually work hardest to receive do not always match up.”

Article Keywords:   technology  


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